What's New in ioFog 2?

Following is a list of API breakages and other important changes to user interaction, mostly on the iofogctl usage.

New YAML Kinds

We have split up the previous ControlPlane kind into three: ControlPlane, KubernetesControlPlane, and LocalControlPlane. This change makes our deployment specs more explicit and less error prone. See the reference docs for full details.

Container Key added to Microservice YAML Specification

We realised that the specification for Microservices was a bit confusing, so we have added a new container key. The container key contains all configuration related to the actual Docker container running on the Agent.

Before:

apiVersion: iofog.org/v2
kind: Microservice
metadata:
  name: msvc-1
spec:
  agent:
    name: agent-name
    config: {}
  images:
    x86: hello-world
  env:
    - key: MY_ENV
      value: 42
  ports:
    - internal: 80
      external: 5000
  rootHostAccess: true
  volumes: []
  commands: []
  config:
    config-key: 'config-value'
  application: app-1
  routes:
    - msvc-2

After:

apiVersion: iofog.org/v2
kind: Microservice
metadata:
  name: msvc-1
spec:
  agent:
    name: alpaca-1
    config: {}
  images:
    x86: hello-world
  container: # This is the new key
    env:
      - key: MY_ENV
        value: 42
    ports:
      - internal: 80
        external: 5000
    rootHostAccess: true
    volumes: []
    commands: []
  config:
    config-key: 'config-value'
  application: app-1
  routes:
    - msvc-2

This way it is clear as to which information relates to the ioFog Microservice and which information relates to the configuration of the actual container running on the Agent.

Configure Default Namespace

You can now configure which namespace is used as by default by running:

iofogctl configure default-namespace namespace-1

This allows you to use any namespace when omitting the --namespace or -n flag from iofogctl commands.

Prune Docker on an Agent

Agent disk space is a precious resource. We can reclaim disk space by pruning Docker images from our Agents:

iofogctl prune agent agent-1

You can also configure an automated pruning frequency using the AgentConfig kind

apiVersion: iofog.org/v2
kind: AgentConfig
metadata:
  name: alpaca-1
spec:
  pruningFrequency: 300 # Prune every 300 seconds

Move a Microservice to another Agent

Up until now, if you needed to move a Microservice to another Agent, you had to update its deployment YAML file, and redeploy the Microservice.

Now, you can simply use:

iofogctl move microservice agent-1 agent-2

Detach / Attach an Agent

Ever wondered how to transfer an Agent from one ECN to another? It's very simple:

iofogctl detach agent agent-1 -n namespace-1
iofogctl attach agent agent-1 -n namespace-2

Keep in mind that detaching an agent will delete its connection with the Controller, and all Microservices will be shut down.

If you have an Agent ready and running on a remote host, you can also attach it directly using host and ssh credentials:

iofogctl attach agent agent-1 --host 123.123.123.123 --user foo --port 22 --key ~/.ssh/id_rsa

New Volume Kind

Does your microservice require some secret files or initialisation data?

You have always been able to use volume mappings to mount agent folders into your Microservice container. However, until now there was no way to send those files/folders to your Agent using iofogctl.

We have now introduced a new Volume kind that which, when deployed, will let iofogctl copy folders over to your Agents over SSH.

apiVersion: iofog.org/v2
kind: Volume
spec:
  name: secret
  source: /tmp/
  destination: /tmp/secrets/
  permissions: 666
  agents:
    - agent-1
    - agent-2

This will create a folder /tmp/secrets/ on both agents agent-1 and agent-2, and copy the contents of /tmp/ of the computer running iofogctl into it.

Microservice Public Ports

Public Ports allow your microservices to securely expose public endpoints without opening ports on your Agents.

When deploying applications and microservices, you can now specify extra fields (public, host and protocol) when configuring the port mappings of your container.

If public is specified, this will open a tunnel that will forward all traffic incoming onto the port exposed by the container.

host allows you to specify the Agent that will open the public port, the default value being that the public port is opened alongside your Controller (same host for a Vanilla Controller, as a separate Load Balancer for a K8s deployment).

protocol lets you decide between http and tcp. It tells the public port which type of traffic to forward. the default value is http.

...
name: msvc-1
agent:
 name: agent-1
container:
 ...
 ports:
 - internal: 80
   external: 5000
   public: 5001
   protocol: tcp
...

Deploying such a configuration would result in port 5001 being opened on the Controller host, and all incoming tcp traffic would be tunneled to agent-1, port 5000.

The public address can be retrieved using:

iofogctl describe microservice msvc-1

The outputted YAML will contain a publicLink key, with the value set to the URL of the public port.

Connector has been Replaced with AMQP Routers

We have removed Connector from ioFog altogether.

The communication between Agents, the transmission of ioMessages, and the public port tunneling is done using AMQP routers.

By default, when deploying a Controller, an interior router gets deployed next to it. If not specified otherwise at deploy time, each Agent will run an edge router, connected to the main interior router.

Using the AgentConfig kind, it is possible to define your own network topology, and run an interior router on an Agent, or have an Agent that does not run any router but connects to the edge router of another accessible Agent on its network.

When the network topology is customised, it allows for direct communication between Agents on the same network, without going back upstream to the default interior router.

If you want to know more about this, please contact us on Slack and a member of our team will take the time of helping you through setting up your own network topology.